• Winter Harbour: survival on edge of Vancouver Island

    They dot the history books as afterthoughts and the back roads of Vancouver Island like the smoke of an extinguished fire.

    Holberg, Granby, Leechtown — once vital Island communities built around gold, coal and the heat of the cold war, diminished to memory and shadow as their raison d’etre evaporated to the whims of the economy and the vagaries of the time. None of these communities have vanished entirely, but what they are and how they are perceived has certainly been changed by factors largely outside their control.

    Will Winter Harbour suffer a similar fate?

    Most Vancouver Islanders have heard of Winter Harbour, few have visited. A quaint Island outpost located at the mouth of Quatsino Sound, it is brief respite of humanity along one the Island’s most isolating stretches of coastline — literally and metaphorically, a port from the storm.

    It has carved a lengthy existence as a way station for vessels passing along our northwest shores, for sport and commercial fishermen chasing their catch, and for loggers leapfrogging rugged mountainsides for their harvest. It offers shelter, food and fuel in the remote wild.

    And it has reason to question its future.

    The 2016 census marks Winter Harbour as having just five permanent residents down from the 20 listed in 2011. It also lists 59 private dwellings, an indication of the transient nature of the community. Few live in Winter Harbour. More visit for while. Or at least they have.

    First the fishing boats dwindled, a victim of the decline of the commercial fishery in the 1990s. The village used to see roughly 1,500 boats come throughout the season and was home to a multitude of fish buyers. But after reductions to the commercial salmon allowable catch, the industry completely disappeared.

    Then, last September, the economy struck another blow: the loss of W.D. Moore Logging, a family-run business that had been operating in Winter Harbour for more than 90 years. About 25 lost their jobs.

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    “Winter Harbour is in quite a transition right now with us downsizing the camp,” said Jon Moore, whose great-grandfather Albert Moore founded what became W.D. Moore Logging in the late 1920s.